Scholarly

Disrupting the World of Science Publishing
November 29, 2016 at 3:08 pm

Every scientist wants his or her paper to appear in Cell, Nature or Science. In today’s scientific world, being associated with such publications is synonymous with prestige and excellence, opening doors to top positions and coveted awards. Nonetheless, these journals are typically known to have an acceptance rate of 5-10 percent, meaning that the other…

If You Build Better Metadata, Readers Will Come
November 29, 2016 at 10:26 am

Creating or aggregating content and actually getting readers to see it are two sides of the same coin. Without both content and a reliable way for people to find it, the motivation to create or house such content becomes less. One feeds the other. So, how do content aggregators and authors find that sweet spot…

University Press Week: When the Mission Isn’t Money
November 21, 2016 at 12:08 pm

With its theme of “Celebrate Community,” University Press Week has spotlighted the 141 member-publishers of the Association of American University Presses (AAUP). They’re located in 42 states and 14 countries, with an aggregate total of approximately 288,000 titles published. University Press Week—this year November 14 to 19—was launched 1978 under US president Jimmy Carter. The current University Press…

Why Hasn’t Scientific Publishing Been Disrupted Already?
October 27, 2016 at 10:53 am

Looking back on 2009, there was one particular note that seemed to sound repeatedly, resonating through the professional discourse at conferences and in posts throughout the blogosphere: the likelihood of disruptive change afoot in the scientific publishing industry. Here in the digital pages of the Scholarly Kitchen, for example, we covered John Wilbanks’ presentation at SSP IN and Michael Nielsen’s…

Is There a Future for Open Access in the Humanities & Social Sciences?
October 13, 2016 at 8:30 am

Perhaps somewhat surprisingly, deciding whether to accept full-cost publishing grants that require open digital editions of long-form humanities and social sciences (HSS) monographs may prove to be the most important challenge university presses face over the next twelve months. While open access (OA) has been a feature of the scholarly publishing landscape for quite some…

How Much Does Scholarly Publishing Cost?
September 9, 2016 at 2:50 pm

The Journal of Electronic Publishing (JEP) has a very good issue out now on publishing economics, which I recommend to everyone. (The issue is labelled “Volume 19, No. 1: Economics of Publishing,” a useful atavism.) There are a number of good articles here, including the very well-written introduction by the editor, Maria Bonn.  I looked…

Wiley's Education Business Continues Decline; Bright Spots in Journals and Professional Development
September 7, 2016 at 12:16 pm

Today education, journal, and professional publisher John Wiley & Sons released its Q1 results for the 2017 fiscal year. While the publisher experienced growth in its journal and professional development businesses, its education division saw significant revenue declines, thanks to low-performing textbooks. Wiley’s overall revenue decreased 4% from Q1 2016, declining from $423 million to…

Going Beyond Impact Factors — Reforming Scientific Publishing to Value Integrity
August 26, 2016 at 11:36 am

Sometimes working in academia feels like being a gymnast at the Olympics. Not because we're tumbling through the lab in glittering costumes, but because of the constant pressure to succeed. Gymnasts are tasked to perform more spectacular routines at every competition, while scientists are expected to publish several high impact papers a year. And as…

How to Bring Science Publishing into the 21st Century
August 11, 2016 at 12:40 pm

The paradox of 21st-century science is that increasingly complex and collaborative cutting-edge research is still being written and published using 20th-century tools. The essential question—How come the internet age has yet to deliver a collaborative writing and publishing tool for research?—is what two of my physicist friends and I were thinking about several years ago…