EBooks are changing education, starting from the teachers on down. Two recent stories have showed how developers are using digital textbooks to change the way teachers and students engage. The first story comes out of Pennsylvania where teachers at Mercersburg Academy have created textbooks they want using iBooks. According to a release, teachers have created […]

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A memo yesterday from Markus Dohle, CEO, Penguin Random House, and Madeline McIntosh, U.S. President and Chief Operating Officer announced that the Penguin warehouses in Kirkwood, New York and Pittston, Pennsylvania will close a year from now, signaling a major step in the Penguin Random House merger.

According to the memo, the closure of the two facilities will begin in February 2015 and be complete by June 2015. The operations at the two Penguin warehouses will move to the Random House warehouses located in Westminster, Maryland and Crawfordsville, Indiana.

This is part of our occasional series Talking Shop with an Indie Bookseller. Farley’s Bookshop in New Hope, Pennsylvania is trying something new: they sell books from small presses with a consignment model, devoting their space and energy to prominent in-store location (think: poetry volumes face-out at the front of the store) and extensive marketing. Melville House spoke with bookseller William Hastings.

 Lori Hettler is a passionate reader, tearing through about 80 books a year. But as a resident of a Pennsylvania town and with a preference for fiction from small publishers, she can have trouble finding new books to feed her habit.

She tried to start a book club, but there weren’t enough takers. For years she made a weekly trip to browse a bookstore 40 minutes away in a Scranton suburb.

But then she found a solution to her problem:, a social media site for finding and sharing titles that has 15 million members…

While no publisher can realistically abstain from the online retail behemoths when it comes to book selling, there is no reason why selling directly to consumers cannot be a viable option, especially if publishers work to build relationships with readers. In the tips below from five different publishers on how they have found success with direct selling, certain themes recur: building trust with readers, smart audience targeting and cultivating an overarching brand sensibility.

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