Chad Harbach

Michael Pietsch is Executive Vice President and Publisher of Little, Brown and Company. On April 1 he will step into the role of CEO of the Hachette Book Group. Here Pietsch shares some thoughts about his career with Book Business.

Goliath vs Goliath … Amazon takes on Apple and Google (The Telegraph) Amazon to See a New Cloud Market in 2013 (The Street) Bookshops can’t compete with Amazon on price. If they want to survive, they have to provide a personal touch (The Telegraph) Kindle Daily Deals: The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach | Miss [...]

The post Morning Links — An Amazonian Briefing appeared first on TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics.

Earlier this month, Slate writer Jacob Silverman wrote that having a likable Twitter persona “epitomizes the mutual admiration society that is today’s literary culture, particularly online.”  In other words, he thinks the Internet is coddling writers and softening critics, to the detriment of Meaningful Literary Criticism.

Literary critics everywhere joined in, creating a recursive loop of criticism about criticism about criticism.

As the year draws to a close, critics honor best-seller Ann Patchett, newcomer Téa Obreht, and the late David Foster Wallace Téa Obreht's debut novel, "The Tiger's Wife," is among the year's best, and follows a young doctor as she delivers medicine to orphans, while also dealing with the news of her grandfather's death. Photo: SEE ALL 10 PHOTOS 1. The Tiger's Wife (Random House, $15) Téa Obreht's debut novel is "unusual in content, wise beyond its author's years, and completely engrossing," said Maya Muir in the Portland Oregonian. Set in an unspecified Balkan country in the aftermath

Happy Thanksgiving, Book Business readers!

May we recommend you check out (but don't gore yourself on)the year's 100 notable tomes in fiction, poetry and nonfiction as selected by the New York Times between drumsticks, football games and "quality time" with extended family. Remember, it's about portion control, people.


The economics of the book business are changing so rapidly the industry barely looks like it did just six months ago.

The era of the book superstores, with their big windows and welcoming tables stacked high with books, has gone into decline. Many of the country's most enthusiastic readers have already switched to less-costly digital books. Amazon customers now buy more Kindle titles than hardcovers and paperbacks.

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