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Expert's Edge
January 1, 2001

Copying is Good In this age of Napster, book technologists and digital rights providers often suggest (incorrectly) that the electronic publishing industry requires more sophisticated copy protection and that consumers be taught that copying is illegal. Did I mention that this idea is wrong? Copying is not illegal. Unauthorized copying is illegal And though it may surprise some, authorized copying of digital goods can be an e-publisher's best friend. My company, Digital Goods (formerly SoftLock.com), has a mission to foster an e-publishing ecology in which rights-protected digital content sells, and sells again. In order to do that best, book publishers should not focus on preventing copying,

Stow It
January 1, 2001

What to consider when shopping for a digital achive system Special to BookTech by Danny O. Snow Today's publishers need effective solutions for securely and efficiently storing the digital assets. Of course, there are many important factors to consider when selecting a digital asset management (DAM) system: cost, ease of use, security, scalability, available features and online capabilities. In addition, a DAM solution's ability to enhance cross-media publishing; provide both in-house and vendor access to the digital assets; and interpreting legacy files can play an important role in a publisher's success. Finally, a publisher must weigh in-house asset management against the out-sourcing alternative.

Meet Production Deadlines
November 1, 2000

Tips on Negotiating a Schedule That Works By Michael Washburn Your publishing house just signed a contract for the next book of pictures by a famous photojournalist. The publicity department wants to set up signings in bookstores in several cities, and requests for advance copies are already coming through the fax machine. As the production manager for this book, you hate to think of what will happen if any snags derail the project and set back the release date by days or weeks. You must make the job go smoothly. In order to do that, you need to be hyper-aware of the lurking

CTP for Four-Color
November 1, 2000

A review of the technology today, and a preview of trends for tomorrow By Danny O. Snow This article: * reviews computer-to-plate (CTP) technology; * discusses its use in four-color printing; * offers tips on how to get the best results using CTP; and * previews future developments. The methods printers use to put words and four-color images on paper have changed dramatically in the past few years. New digital methods have largely replaced traditional processes that involved art boards, cameras and film. Computer-to-plate (CTP) technology allows the transfer of digital files from computers directly to printing plates. Most CTP systems

Binding for Digital Short-Run Book Projects
November 1, 2000

By Cheryl A. Adams To stay competitive in today's fast-paced business environment, book manufacturers are turning to the latest in digital printing/binding technology. Using such strategies, they can print on-demand books, soft- or hard-cover, quickly and cost effectively, without creating excess inventory. "When rapid delivery is expected with each order — especially in the non-inventory, e-commerce environment — automatic processes become critical," says Jim Augustine, vice president of national sales, Xyan.com, King of Prussia, Pa. Indeed, in today's digital short-run book market, automatic turnaround often isn't a problem. Not even for quantities of one and case-bound books. In as little as one minute, a

Turning Content Into Gold
September 1, 2000

Microsoft's release of the Pocket PC with e-book reader software may mark a crucial step in the development of electronic books. Here's why. By Danny O. Snow In ancient times, alchemists sought in vain for the mythical "Philosopher's Stone," fabled to transmute base metals into precious ones. The lure of turning lead to gold was irresistible, but the Philosopher's Stone proved elusive, and the alchemists faded away after centuries of fruitless searching. In recent times, publishers have been equally tantalized by the potentials of e-publishing: a way to make books available worldwide without printing costs, without warehousing and inventory, without shipping, without returns, and

Industry Watch
September 1, 2000

Trends in Mergers and Acquisitions During the BookTech 2000 seminar "Quick Update: Digital Technologies and Economic Trends," Mark Bawden, senior vice president, sales and marketing, Von Hoffman Graphics, outlined current trends in mergers and acquisitions. He also noted the factors behind them in the book publishing industry. Why do book printers merge? * To achieve faster growth in their niche; * to expand into other niches; * to add "mass" to go public; * in response to changes in print buying habits; * in recognition of manufacturing synergies; * because of technology issues; * in reaction to family business issues. * in response to merging of customers within a niche; * to expand into other

Dump That Paperwork
September 1, 2000

by Tatyana Sinioukov The graphic arts community has gotten very good at digitizing isolated points of the workflow process. Now it's time to connect the dots. Should publishers have electronic access to the printers' schedules -- and vice versa? How can they exchange files: FTP, EDI, Web sites or e-mail? Gone are the days of packing FedEx boxes and relying on just the hard media. That said, it takes communication and determination to ensure successful data-sharing between publishers and suppliers. "There are a lot of advantages to data-sharing," said Brenda Brown, manager, book engineering/preflight, Malloy Lithographing, Ann Arbor, Mich. "It takes some work and partnering to get to

The Top 25 Book Manufacturers - Intro
September 1, 2000

The Top 25 Book Manufacturers R.R. Donnelley & Sons, Chicago, continued its reign in 1999 as North America's leading book manufacturer, as measured by book printing sales volume. They remained at the top of the list even after Quebecor's acquisition last year of World Color Press, which propelled the combined company, Quebecor World, into the top slot among all commercial printers. Indeed, total sales for Quebecor World reached $6.16 billion in 1999, to R.R. Donnelley & Sons' $5 billion. However, when measured by book manufacturing revenue, Donnelley stays at the head of the pack, churning out high-volume bestsellers such as Tom Clancy's new book

About the Top 25
September 1, 2000

1. R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company is the leading North American book printer. The company's book operations provide a full range of integrated service solutions to help book publishers deliver communications to their customers. With seven book operations across the nation, R.R. Donnelley provides services such as * hardcover and softcover book manufacturing using web-offset, sheetfed-offset and digital printing technology; * conventional and digital prepress operations, including composition and page makeup; * custom publishing and print on demand; * packaging design and assembly; and * online services, in which customers' digital information is converted into Web-ready formats. 2. Quebecor World is the largest commercial

Shoot The Cake, And Eat It Too
September 1, 2000

What if you had exactly three minutes to make a perfect picture -- well, good enough to eat -- before the garnish wilted, ice cream melted and the chicken breast turned gray? Indeed, art directors and photographers who work on cookbooks have their work cut out for them. But there's a payoff. They often get to eat the food they shoot -- if they don't mind, of course, that the strawberry shortcake spends a few minutes on the set first. Food photography So what do art directors and photographers do to make the image leap off the page and entice the reader's aesthetic senses? Traditionally, the tricks used

Bargaining Skills 101
September 1, 2000

by Tatyana Sinioukov What is truly negotiable in terms of print contracts? Almost anything, according to Barbara Hagen, senior product specialist, C.J. Krehbiel, Cincinnati, OH, who spoke on the subject at the BookTech West session titled "The Clever Negotiator: Everyone Wins" session. Book publishers, she continued, just have to know how to better negotiate with vendors about a job. Hagen gave her audience a few pointers on perfecting their bargaining skills * Pick the right vendor for the right project. Make sure your vendors can provide all necessary services in house, Hagen suggested. If your cover is four-color, or, say, requires lamination, the vendor should be able

Harry Potter Breaks All Records
September 1, 2000

By now, no doubt, you've heard about Harry's astounding success. If you have to ask "Harry who?" you've probably been living on Mars for the past two months. Scholastic Books, New York, released children's book Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire on July 8 with an initial printing of 3.8 million copies -- the largest initial press run in history. Almost 3 million copies moved during its first weekend in circulation, including more than 1 million copies that were sold in advance. Three days after the book's debut, Scholastic announced a second printing, increased from 2 million to 3 million copies, based on

Content is King at World Book
July 1, 2000

World Book Inc.'s (WB) book-and-CD products were all the rage back in August 1998 when BookTech the Magazine ran a cover story on this Chicago-based company. WB had just launched the book-and-CD educational series titled Interfact, and its flagship product, the World Book Encyclopedia, was being released as 22 print volumes (comprising more than 14,000 pages) and as a two-disc CD-ROM. Since then, WB took its content to different places, including the Internet, not just carving a niche for itself in the education and general consumer markets, but continually exploring new publishing models, as well. Michael Ross, executive vice president and publisher (pictured at

The Future of E-Books
July 1, 2000

We asked publishers: "What is your take on the future of e-books? What impact do you think they'll have on book publishing within a couple of years and on the way your company produces books?" John Calvano, editorial operations manager, Time Inc. Home Entertainment, New York City: "Of course, issues such as e-books and our company's impending merger with AOL create an 'open book' with regards to the digital asset of our content. Barring technological hurdles at present, our largely pictorial products are not as well suited for an e-book format as they are for a larger color screen. "They feasibly could be

Major Book Publishers Unveil Their E-Book Offerings
July 1, 2000

By Donna Loyle Some of the country's largest book publishing companies recently unveiled major new electronic-book initiatives, bringing renewed energy into the e-book arena. Time Warner's iPublish.com at Time Warner Books, New York City, scheduled to launch in the first quarter of 2001, will offer fiction and non-fiction content created specifically for the Internet, according to company officials. Meanwhile, Random House and Simon & Schuster, along with Microsoft, gave away copies of Michael Crichton's new novel Timeline, as well as some "Star Trek" series novels, all downloadable onto Microsoft's new e-book Reader software. In June, CBS News and Simon & Schuster, both owned by Viacom, co-published an exclusive

Two Roads Diverged
July 1, 2000

A Review of New E-Publishing Products From Adobe and Microsoft By Danny O. Snow New technologies may make publishers want to echo Robert Frost's classic lament, that a traveller can follow only one fork in the road at a time. Major new products specifically designed for delivery of online content have set the publishing industry abuzz, amid a flurry of controversy over earlier efforts to bring e-books more squarely into mainstream markets. Software industry leaders now offer e-publishers new strategies for the presentation of online content to readers -- but both systems must face the challenge of protecting intellectual property for the author and publisher. WebBuy and PDF

After Riding the Bullet
May 1, 2000

After Riding the Bullet Simon & Schuster Online's high-profile e-book trial proved that e-books can be popular. This was good, but the Stephen King novella was popular enough to attract hackers. Now what? by Rose Blessing "We certainly don't fold up our tent here," says Adam Rothberg, director of corporate communications, the lucky one at Simon & Schuster Online assigned to answer reporters' calls on the issue of the hacking of the Stephen King e-book Riding the Bullet. "We believe in the e-book just as strongly as we did before." But S&S Online also acknowledges that the event highlighted the importance of good security: "It's unfortunate, but some

Providers of CD-Rom Manufacturing Services
May 1, 2000

Suppliers of CD-ROM manufacturing services include Acer Peripherals * www.acerperipherals.com 888-723-2238 Acme CD Manufacturing * www.acmecd.com 800-449-5326 APS Tech * www.apstech.com 800-395-5871 Ball Media * www.ballmedia.com 888-256-DISC (3472) CD DVD America * www.dmoz.cc 203-259-6245 CDMAN * www.cdman.com 800-557-3347 CDROMMailers.com * www.cdrommailers.com 818-865-7942 CGI Direct Digital printing * www.cgidirect.com 800-837-4399 Chrystal Sand * www.chrystal-sand.com 877-864-7771; 415-864-7771 Cinram International * www.cinram.com 416-298-8190 Disc Makers * www.discmakers.com/cdrom 800-237-6666 Disctronics * www.discusa.com 972-881 8800 (USA div. is located in Dallas) ESP * www.esp-cd.com 800-527-9225, 716-691-7631 Information Packaging Corp. (IPC) * www.infopkg.com 800-776-7633 J.S. Productions * www.execulink.com 877-753-2323, 519-756-7711 JVC * www.jvc-america.com 800-537-5722 Hewlett-Packard * www.hp.com 800-826-4111 Magnetic Air

InDesign 1.5- All in Favor
May 1, 2000

by Tatyana Sinioukov However slowly, book manufacturers are getting ready to embrace Adobe InDesign 1.5, a wisely priced and vastly improved upgrade to 1.0 Adobe InDesign 1.5, the recently released upgrade to Adobe's professional page layout and design program InDesign 1.0, offers several features that enhance its PDF workflow and integration with other Adobe products. Like its previous version, InDesign 1.5 can be integrated with Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator files; InDesign 1.5 also opens QuarkXPress and Adobe PageMaker files directly. A reported over 70 new or improved features include design tools (some are standard in other Adobe products) like the eyedropper, free transform and smooth paths,