Offset

Navigating the Global Market
October 1, 2004

If you're considering offshore sourcing, here are some additional words of caution. Milton Batalion, senior vice president of production and manufacturing for Time Warner Book Group, says selecting an offshore printer is much like selecting a domestic printer. But no matter what printer you choose, challenges can arise in managing such a long-distance relationship, primarily in shipping and potential delays. Rail congestion, for example, has been a recent concern, as it is making it difficult for book shipments arriving on the West Coast to be moved on time. "It could be just the peak season, but it's also likely that there is just a

Offshoring and the Global Marketplace
October 1, 2004

Offshoring has taken on new meaning in recent years. The Web, electronic file transfer, advancements in foreign technology and faster, better ways to communicate globally have all stirred the waters of opportunity for tapping the American marketplace from overseas. A global marketplace has swelled beyond what many expected. For some, this means greater opportunity, savings and growth. For others, it means the promise of more jobless Americans, more abandoned factories, more unfair labor competition. For many book publishers, specifically, it means more options for manufacturing books cost-effectively. It means new options for digital content creation, design and editorial. It means increased profitability, growth

Banta Expands Va. Distribution Center
August 1, 2004

Banta Corp. expanded its Harrisonburg, Va., distribution facility to accommodate new business, spending $6.5 million to extend the facility by 179,000 square feet. The company expanded the center to 433,000 square feet and added 20,000 full pallet locations, conveyor belts and returns processing equipment. The distribution center connects to Banta's print facility where finished products are moved from the bindery to the distribution center using self-guided vehicles. The added space improves the efficiencies at the facility, including reducing fulfillment and transportation costs, says Dwayne Black, VP of operations for Banta. The addition increases Banta's processing capability to 5,500 cartons of books and materials a

BCI Begins U.S. Production of Graphic Board
June 1, 2004

A new U.S.-based mill producing graphic board (a type of cover board made with specific fibers) is up and running after several months of preparations. The Newark Group Inc., manufacturer of recycled paperboard, invested more than $100 million to fit a Fitchburgh, Mass., mill that it purchased last fall for producing graphic board for its Graphicboard Products BCI division. Company officials say the mill is the only producer of graphic board in the United States. The company invested in the mill so it could offer a full range of thicknesses of its NewEx brand of graphic board product at an annual

A 'World's First' for 'World's Oldest' Bookbinder
February 1, 2004

Acme Bookbinding's newest worker can't get injured on the job when doing back-breaking work. The reason: It's a robot. One of the most labor-intensive and expensive tasks in our industry is the chore of cutting cover materials for hardcover bindings. Generally, cutting cover materials is not a problem for large edition bindings. Kolbus and Crawley have furnished the industry with equipment where cover materials cut from rolls are de-curled, and are either sheeted or cut to size, with remarkable efficiency. Still, lifting a 54" roll of covering material, and mounting it into a cloth cutting machine, is hard, back-breaking work. These days, with larger edition runs increasingly

Antarctica Bound
October 1, 2003

With an emphasis on computerized design and workflow; increased use of digital, on-demand and cross-media output; and populist—indeed, personal editorial standards, modern book publishing bears little resemblance to the craft practiced a generation ago. Some in the industry worry that the joined-at-the-hip crafts of publishing and printing are epochs approaching an end. In the future, anyone with an Internet connection and digital cash will be able to publish a nice looking (and, hopefully, nice reading) hardbound, softbound, or e-book. One, some, or all three. Readers will buy them online, for an e-pittance, in numbers unthinkable today, along with the classics, pop titles, textbooks,

California Mandates Lighter Textbooks
August 1, 2003

A hefty challenge to create lighter textbooks is on deck for publishers next year. A law recently passed in the trend-setting state of California calls for maximum weight limits on all elementary and secondary school textbooks. The deadline for these limits to be set: July 1, 2004. The law was drafted in response to parents who were "incensed over the heavy backpacks their children have been forced to carry to school each day," says Elise Thurau, a senior consultant to Democratic California Senator Jackie Speier, and a principal co-author of the legislation. The legislation was supported by chiropractors, pediatricians, and the United States Consumer

Demand for Recycled Grows
May 1, 2003

The drive for recycled paper in the book industry seems to be picking up speed. Twenty-five U.S. publishers have signed a letter of intent to begin phasing in post-consumer recycled paper over the next three to five years. Indeed, publishers throughout North America are beginning to take strong stands on recycled paper. Canadian firms, such as Broadview Press of Calgary, Alberta, are making similar commitments. The U.S. effort is spearheaded by the Green Press Initiative (GPI), a non-profit effort dedicated to preserving forests and natural resources. "We're trying to mobilize the book publishing sector," says Tyson Miller, program director for the

Time Machine
May 1, 2003

There's only one way a print shop makes money: When the presses are running. When presses are idle, jobs are delayed, worker productivity plummets, and customers start screaming. Excluding system failures, the biggest culprit behind downtime is the make-ready process. That's when operators shut presses down to adjust paper size, ink settings, and feeders. Make-ready limits how many jobs printers can fit in an eight-hour shift. But some press manufacturers offer technology that cuts make-ready time to zero. They're called, appropriately enough, zero-make-ready (ZMR) presses. "The time it takes from form to form, plus how many signatures of waste you create form

Ames Eases Content Conversion
May 1, 2003

Ames On-Demand has released a new version of its popular BookBuild online ordering and content management system. The new release helps publishers better communicate with creative staff, and more easily reuse content across multiple publications, company officials say. It remains directly connected to Ames' high-speed digital presses, allowing custom publishers to manage content, order, and printing entirely online. The update, dubbed version 3.0, provides publishers and writers with a centrally shared, secure publication repository. Users can upload and store content as separate elements, such as chapters, tables of contents, and graphics. Using an online form, publishers can drag+drop the content into templates, get