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Graph Expo Bound
November 1, 2002

For book manufacturing constituents looking for cutting edge solutions to their bindery equipment needs, an early October trip to Chicago may have been a good place to start. Several manufacturers exhibited their back gluing, casing-in, casemaking and manufacturing lines at the 2002 Graph Expo. Exhibitors were pleasantly surprised by the number of attendees at this year's show (nearly 38,000, according to the organizers), lending an air of optimism to the future of the printing industry. BTM details the latest from some of the exhibitors who were on hand to demonstrate their offerings. Banner Banner American Products (www.banam.com), a manufacturer and distributor of pouch and

Safety First
May 1, 2002

Those vinyl books that make bath time so much fun for kids present a much different challenge to Nadine Britt. She is the production director at Penguin Putnam (www.penguinputnam.com) and oversees the Dutton, Grosset & Dunlap and Price Stern Sloan mass merchandise children's imprints. With 11 children's imprints and 15 adult imprints, Penguin Putnam is a division of the Penguin Group, the second-largest English-language trade book publisher in the world. Formed in 1996 as a result of the merger between Penguin Books USA and The Putnam Berkeley Group, the Penguin Group has primary operations in the United Kingdom, Australia, the United States and

The Demand For On-Demand
March 1, 2002

Print-on-demand (POD), like so many new technologies that have threatened to shake up the status quo of the publishing industry, has garnered its fair share of attention from both enthusiasts and naysayers. But philosophical debates and questions about its potential aside, there appears to be little doubt about the benefits of POD. Continuing, technological advances will most likely erase any nagging doubts about quality and profitability. One thing is clear, the market for POD is growing. In 2000, U.S. companies spent $3.1 billion for black-and-white POD systems and related services and supplies, according to CAP Ventures (www.capv.com). The research firm projects the market

Strength in Papers
March 1, 2002

Some make a splash. Others won't tear. For swimmers who need to read workout guides in the pool or publishers wishing to avoid damage from freight distribution, durable papers are unique alternatives to traditional stock. Added to the staple of synthetic and super-substrates on the market, some publishers have even invested in water-proof materials to ensure that the books they produce survive in less traditional reading environments. The waterproof materials, though rare compared to a non-synthetic such as TruTech, are examples of how diverse book market concepts can be applied to multiple projects. As a result, future readers, who may be chin-deep in the

RosettaBooks To Address BookTech 2002
January 10, 2002

Last year, nearly 3,700 book publishing professionals from across North America convened in New York City for BookTech, the only event focused on the latest technologies and techniques in the book and e-book publishing industry. The total attendance surpassed the previous year by 21 percent, and was demonstrated by a packed exhibit hall, crowded keynote address, and standing room only conference rooms. The event featured industry experts from leading companies such as Microsoft, Adobe Systems, ContentGuard, The Lehigh Press, The Mazor Corp., Simon & Schuster and World Book, among others. Leading publishers spoke of hot topics like ASP's, e-book formatting, marketing and distribution,

Taking Stock
January 1, 2002

In looking back on 2001, the state of the pulp and paper market can be best described as volatile. And as the strains of "Auld Lang Syne" fade away, the outlook does not appear to be any more stable for the coming year. In fact, due to the dipping economic outlook that many pundits predicted months ago, paper buying has taken on a renewed set of competitive objectives starting foremost (and not surprisingly) with affordability. Since slower publishing demands contributed to a waning paper market throughout 2001, according to the Labor Department's International Price Program, buying habits have been greatly affected. Coupled with international

The Iditarod Diaries
July 1, 2001

How the 30-year-young Alaskan trek turned to a new breed of substrate to document 2001 results or 30 years, the course, which spans 1,161 miles of Alaskan wilderness, beckons more than 60 dog sled teams, each hungry to conquer the title of Iditarod champion and the $50,000 first-prize purse. The trek is one of the most challenging, historically rich sporting events. Mushers (the sled drivers) from countries far and wide team with faithful canine companions to cross treacherous mountains, rolling rivers and miles of desolate tundra. Victory is sweet for winners of this highly anticipated sporting event, long ago dubbed "The Last Great Race."

Off the Paper Roller Coaster
July 1, 2001

When it comes to predicting prices in the pulp and paper market, it seems as though we are lost in a maze, hoping for a magical crystal ball that predicts our future. The pulp and paper industry is indeed on of the most financially volatile businesses out there, but thanks to some financial strategies, paper specifiers no longer have to try to predict market fluctuations and run the risks associated with guessing incorrectly. A volatile scenario Since 1991, 40lb. No.5 stock prices rose and fell an average of eight times a year, varying between two and 13 percent with each fluctuation. It seemed impossible

On a Road Less Traveled
May 1, 2001

A few blocks from Philadelphia's famous Colonial-era buildings—buildings in which the founding fathers signed the Declaration of Independence and drafted the U.S. Constitution—is an old restored brownstone. Away from the throngs of roving tourists, this quaint, historic building houses a contemporary publishing company that turns out some of the most creative and innovative book projects on the market today. Running Press, an independent trade publishing house, specializes in highly designed adult non-fiction books, children's titles and most especially book-plus projects. Bestsellers have included Sisters, a compilation of pictures and compelling stories about the special bond of female siblings, and I Feel Great, And

Angling for a Bigger Piece of the Pie
January 1, 2001

From its humble beginnings publishing a few fishing books, The Lyons Press today casts out 220 titles a year in 14 different categories. The Lyons Press is a classic business-school case study in the value of keeping a sure and nimble hand on the company keel to achieve a well-defined vision. Begun in 1984 by Nick Lyons, a former professor of American Literature at Hunter College and an avid angler, the New York-based company's first year revenues were only $300,000. By 1990, revenues reached $1 million; by 1998, $5 million. And by this coming March, the company's fiscal year earnings are expected to