Hewlett-Packard Co.

Inside the Digital Paper Labs at Xerox and HP
February 1, 2004

Scientists compete to make certain their company's papers don't stick, curl, jam, or smear. But even the finest papers can send a print job amok if environmental conditions are ignored. We take paper sheets for granted, never giving a second thought to the ream of paper we load into the short run digital press, laser printer, or copying machine. But the company that sold the paper is probably obsessed with every scientific detail there is to know. That, in a nutshell, explains why digital press and related vendors are going to great lengths to develop, manufacture, and sell paper that doesn't foul

Green Printing - The New Bottom Line
March 1, 2003

Author Anil K. Gupta said, "Strategy is the art and science of creating the future, managing the present and selectively forgetting the past." Many forget that little over a century ago, when paper was primarily made from recycled rags, arguments raged about whether paper made from wood pulp was fit for use as a printing substrate. Today over 3.5 million people are employed in the wood pulp, paper and paper converting industries worldwide. Book publishers are responsible for buying over 1 million tons of paper made from wood fiber each year. That's a small slice of the more than 100 million tons

September 11 Tragedy
November 1, 2001

The events of September 11, 2001 were of such a horrific and shocking nature that they did not allow for the careful planning that is often associated with the publishing industry. Rather, the devastating terrorist attacks, and their aftermath, demanded quick action to satisfy the public's need for information—and answers. To fulfill this need and to raise money for Red Cross relief efforts, BookSurge.com, BlueEar.com and the New York University (NYU) Department of Journalism joined efforts to produce 09/11 8:48 AM; Documenting America's Greatest Tragedy. The book recounts stories of those who survived the attacks and those who are involved in the civic aftermath.

E-Book News
January 1, 2001

Handheld E-Book Reading By Donna Loyle, Editor They're getting smaller, smarter and cheaper—all at the same time. In the last year or two, numerous handheld e-book reading devices have hit the market. Innovative features include audio capabilities; built-in dictionaries; revolutionary easy-on-the-eyes type; backlit LCD screens; highlighting ability; direct Internet connections; and much more. While this article does not cover all of the e-book readers available (for example, many e-titles can be read on Palm PDAs, which are not marketed as e-book reading units), the information below offers a quick roundup of some of the latest and coolest devices recently introduced. RCA REB1100

Turning Content Into Gold
September 1, 2000

Microsoft's release of the Pocket PC with e-book reader software may mark a crucial step in the development of electronic books. Here's why. By Danny O. Snow In ancient times, alchemists sought in vain for the mythical "Philosopher's Stone," fabled to transmute base metals into precious ones. The lure of turning lead to gold was irresistible, but the Philosopher's Stone proved elusive, and the alchemists faded away after centuries of fruitless searching. In recent times, publishers have been equally tantalized by the potentials of e-publishing: a way to make books available worldwide without printing costs, without warehousing and inventory, without shipping, without returns, and

Creating an Electronic Bestseller
May 1, 2000

A publisher turned to an online e-book purchase and delivery service to convert a traditionally printed bestseller into an electronic product by Tatyana Sinioukov It's no secret that more and more publishers turn to the Internet to market their printed books. Few take it to another level by offering a book in a different shape and form--electronically. In the case of Washington, DC-based Regnery Publishing, a division of Eagle Publishing, two of its bestsellers, The Millennium Bug by Michael S. Hyatt, a #7 bestseller in 1998 on the New York Times business list, and The Year of the Rat by Edward Timperlake and William

Providers of CD-Rom Manufacturing Services
May 1, 2000

Suppliers of CD-ROM manufacturing services include Acer Peripherals * www.acerperipherals.com 888-723-2238 Acme CD Manufacturing * www.acmecd.com 800-449-5326 APS Tech * www.apstech.com 800-395-5871 Ball Media * www.ballmedia.com 888-256-DISC (3472) CD DVD America * www.dmoz.cc 203-259-6245 CDMAN * www.cdman.com 800-557-3347 CDROMMailers.com * www.cdrommailers.com 818-865-7942 CGI Direct Digital printing * www.cgidirect.com 800-837-4399 Chrystal Sand * www.chrystal-sand.com 877-864-7771; 415-864-7771 Cinram International * www.cinram.com 416-298-8190 Disc Makers * www.discmakers.com/cdrom 800-237-6666 Disctronics * www.discusa.com 972-881 8800 (USA div. is located in Dallas) ESP * www.esp-cd.com 800-527-9225, 716-691-7631 Information Packaging Corp. (IPC) * www.infopkg.com 800-776-7633 J.S. Productions * www.execulink.com 877-753-2323, 519-756-7711 JVC * www.jvc-america.com 800-537-5722 Hewlett-Packard * www.hp.com 800-826-4111 Magnetic Air