Via Boing Boing came this story, of a school district in Wisconsin whose librarians were appalled to discover that untrained volunteers were sent in to ‘help’ librarians clear out less-used books, and they were making a mess of it. The workers were reportedly removing many books which were published before 2000 or were not being […]

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Almost 40 percent of K-12 and higher education schools are storing or throwing away textbooks that are dated, damaged or have otherwise reached the end of their productive life, leaving significant potential to increase book recycling programs across the country, according to a new study by the National Wildlife Federation.

The report concludes more education about the benefits of textbook recycling is needed to help schools identify options for recycling of unused textbooks. While the report highlights a number of pilot textbook recycling programs being conducted by higher education institutions such as the University of Wyoming, Columbia College, and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, there are few K-12 school districts participating in similar efforts.

The rush to create large, free online classes has generated anxiety at universities around the country. With finances already tight and with a surge of movement toward online learning, universities are being forced to move quickly to change centuries-old models of learning. Terms like historic, seismic and revolutionary now pop up in descriptions of the challenges that higher education faces in the coming years.

Many institutions have been preparing for these changes for years, building infrastructure and expertise, experimenting and recruiting, and integrating online learning into long-term strategies. 

Barnes & Noble, Inc. (NYSE: BKS) “Barnes & Noble customers are generous every year and this holiday season certainly was no exception. Children who are less fortunate unwrapped many books this year thanks to the thoughtfulness of Barnes & Noble customers,” said Sarah DiFrancesco, Director of Community Relations for Barnes & Noble. “This holiday tradition is a wonderful way for booksellers and customers to come together and give the gift of reading to children in their local communities.” Community partners who have already begun distributing the books collected by Barnes & Noble booksellers include schools, libraries, and social service

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