Marketing

Publishing to a Higher Power
April 1, 2007

Dwight Baker, president of Grand Rapids, Mich.-based Baker Publishing Group—the third-largest publisher in the Evangelical Christian publishing market—arrived in his position from a different starting point than most publishing company presidents, and he’s using that fresh perspective to put his own personal spin on religious publishing. His approach seems to be working. The company’s annual sales in 2006 surpassed $50 million, four of its publishing divisions saw double-digit growth, and it has a current New York Times Best Seller on the market with 1.4 million copies sold. The family business was founded in 1939 by Dwight’s grandfather, Herman Baker. When Dwight was a teenager, he

‘The Secret’ is Out (of Stock)
April 1, 2007

The secret to publishing a runaway best seller is out, and you won’t need to read a book or watch a DVD to get in on it. “The Secret,” a self-help book by Rhonda Byrne, is perhaps the most controversial chart-topper since Dan Brown’s “The Da Vinci Code.” By now you’ve probably heard its premise—that your own thoughts hold the key to a happy, healthy and successful life. Positive thinking attracts positive results, preaches Byrne and a team of “teachers” featured throughout the book. They call it the law of attraction. Your business didn’t fail because you missed a quota or hired the

Q&A with Jamie Raab, the Publisher Behind Warner Books’ New Name
March 30, 2007

Q&A with Jamie Raab, the Publisher Behind Warner Books’ New NameWarner Books announced earlier this week that the New York-based publishing company is changing its name to Grand Central Publishing. The name change was agreed to in the acquisition last year by the French Company Hachette Livre. The new title notably drops the word “books” to embrace publishing in the broader sense of content delivery. Book Business Extra spoke with Senior Vice President and Publisher Jamie Raab, the creator of the new name, to gain insight on the process of rebranding a well-known publishing company. Book Business Extra: Warner Books hired paid

Oprah Announces New Book Club Selection
March 30, 2007

On Wednesday, Oprah Winfrey announced on her TV show that Cormac McCarthy’s “The Road,” published in 2006 by the Knopf Group of Random House Inc., is her second book club pick of the year and just her third overall selection since September 2005 and the controversial “A Million Little Pieces” by James Frey. Oprah’s Book Club was established in September 1996, and since then, her selections have pulled some obscure works onto best-seller lists. However McCarthy’s book is a relatively safe bet for Oprah, already receiving much national acclaim. “The Road” is on the USA Today Bestseller List, a National Book Critic’s

AAP Joins Effort to Standardize Digital Content Access
March 30, 2007

The Association of American Publishers (AAP) has announced it has joined the Automated Content Access Protocol (ACAP). According to the AAP, ACAP is developing and piloting a standard system which allows publishers to express digital content access and usage policies in a language that can be programmed to be recognized by search engines. This is a joint project with the International Publishers Association, European Publishers Council and the World Association of Newspapers. The project’s goal is to serve as a building block for e-commerce in the online publishing world by helping publishers make their licensing terms and e-commerce information universally readable. “ACAP’s specification

A Book With A View
March 1, 2007

A bar of soap that zaps fat, puppies that don’t grow up, and a bug DNA kit. It’s not everyday in a book-marketing veteran’s career that he’s able to be as creative as Jeffrey Yamaguchi has been able to be during the recent marketing campaign for Michael Crichton’s latest best seller, “Next.” While promoting “Next,” Yamaguchi—HarperCollins’ online marketing manager—and his marketing teammates created a fictional genetic research firm by the name of Nextgencode. They then developed fake products supposedly being sold by the company, including a revolutionary weight-loss soap, and supported these ventures with online video commercials that ran on mainstream sites, like

Getting the Word Out There
March 1, 2007

In today’s world where numerous venues exist to sell books—from bookstores to mass-market outlets to catalogs to the Internet to author-supported sales—making the best use of each channel can be challenging. To help make cross-platform marketing more effective, here are some proven insights I’ve learned during more than 25 years of publishing and marketing books. Ninety percent of all marketing efforts are wasted. This law of wasted effort is just a fact of life. It applies to all areas of marketing, from making sales pitches to direct mail to Internet sales. If a publicist actually gets one media hit from every 10 phone calls she makes,

Tim O’Reilly’s Exclusive Interview with Book Business Extra on How O’Reilly Media Built Its Computer Technology Book, Web and Conference Brand
February 2, 2007

O’Reilly Media Inc., a technology publisher, with corporate offices in the heart of the Silicon Valley, utilizes pen and ink woodcut-style drawings of different animals on many of its books. It has been doing so for years, which has helped create greater worldwide recognition for its products. The company, a driving force behind the commercial Internet, Web 2.0, blogging and online book selling, has also perfected the use of brand identity. “Like so many things in life, the O’Reilly animal branding was a combination of luck, generosity and unexpected genius,” says Tim O’Reilly, founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media. “When we first began

HarperCollins Exec Reveals Secrets to Successful Online Book Marketing
January 19, 2007

From developing Internet sites for faux companies, posting scripted videos and creating elaborate storylines that add to a novel’s plot, book publishers are finding the need to interact online with potential book buyers and readers like never before. Jeffrey Yamaguchi, HarperCollins’ online marketing manager, talks with Book Business Extra about the changing needs of marketing a book in today’s digital world. Book Business Extra: Why do publishers have to go to these lengths of creating an elaborate alternative reality to market a book? Jeffrey Yamaguchi: I think the online space allows you to do that, to really explore what a reader will find in

34 Tips, Tactics and Considerations for Using Webcasts to Expand Your Brand
December 1, 2006

On Oct. 19, Book Business held its first webcast for book publishing executives. The webcast was on—what else—but webcasts. Titled, “Expand Your Brand: Webinars for Publishers,” it featured the following speakers: • Twila Bennett, director of marketing, Revell/Baker Publishing Group • Suzie Cross, assistant marketing manager, Revell Books • Sharon Linsenbach, director of e-learning, North American Publishing Co. • Noelle Skodzinski, editor in chief, Book Business • Jeffrey Yamaguchi, online marketing manager, HarperCollins. Book Business compiled the following tips, tactics and considerations for using webcasts as effective marketing and sales tools, based on its recent webcast. If you missed the live event, you can view it at <a